LIT 3015      Ken Harmon
Food in Film and Literature                   [email protected]
Section:  ONLINE                          Yahoo IM: professorkharmon
4.5 Credit Hours                                              Office:  Fifth floor of Gateway Center,
Contact Hours:  45 Lecture Hours                             Suite 530
School of Arts & Sciences                               Office Hours:  TR 9:35-11:30            
Humanities Dept.                                                                     & by appointment
Spring 2011                                Office Phone:  (980) 598-3218                        
                                         
TIME ZONE:
The official time zone for online courses is the Eastern time zone. All deadlines are based on Eastern time.


REQUIRED TEXT(S)/SOFTWARE/HARDWARE/OTHER to be purchased by students:

Bite to Eat Place:  An Anthology of Contemporary Food Poetry and Poetic Prose.  Eds.
              Andrea Adolph, Donald L. Vallis, and Anne F. Walker.  USA: Redwood Coast
              Press, 1995.  ISBN:  0-964-0933-1-6
Dinesen, Isak.  Anecdotes of Destiny. New York:  Vintage Books,  1993 (Vintage
              International Edition).  ISBN:  987-0-679-74333-0
Esquivel, Laura.  Like Water for Chocolate. USA:  Anchor Books, 1995 (First Anchor
             Books edition).  ISBN:  0-385-42017-X
Vapnyar, Lara.  Broccoli and Other Tales of  Food and Love. USA:  Anchor Books, 2008
              (First Anchor Books Edition, June 2009).  ISBN:  978-0-307-27988-0


Required films: Eat Drink Man, Woman, Sideways, & Chocolat (Note:  copies of all films are placed on reserve at each campus).

Note:  in addition to these texts, students will be asked to read and maintain a folder of materials including certain online texts and view films and film excerpts. 


COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is designed to acquaint students with the art forms of film and literature and to teach critical reading/evaluation of theses forms through examination of works, which develop narratives, characters, and themes through the use of food and eating scenes.  Specifically we will examine the connections that food has in art with family, community, love, and sex.

This is both a reading and writing intensive course.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

The student should be able to:

1.  Define and employ basic literary terms and elements and the cinematic techniques in the various art forms.
2.   Identify, explain, and evaluate themes, styles, and techniques employed by authors and screenwriters.
3.  Analyze the incorporation and use of food as a basic element in the various art forms.
4.  Explain how the audience’s perception of the film or literary work is shaped by one’s experience and culture.
5.  Respond both personally and critically to assigned readings and films according to course requisites.


CONTENT OUTLINE:

I.       Introduction to literary and film theory.
         A.   Literary and cinematic terminology
                1.Elements of literature:  plot, setting, theme, metaphor etc
                2.Elements of film:  Camera angles, shots, camera and character
                          movement etc
         B.  Understanding genre and elements of style
                1.Development of literary genres
                2.Three categories of film:  Realism, classicism and formalism
                3.Film/literature and definitions of genres
         C.  Critical analysis and interpretation of film and literature
               1.Case studies, critiques and journals of full length texts, films and  
                          illustrative  excerpts
              2. Comparing and contrasting specific artistic uses of food by different
                          artists

II.Food as Metaphor and Theme
           A.Character:
           B.Narrative Structure and Development
                       1.Film/literature:  Familly
                       2.       Cultural references in literature and film
           C.Figurative uses of Food
                       1.Allusions in literature and film
                       2.Food as metaphor, motif and symbol
           D.Universal Themes
                       1.Food as statements of culture and community
                       2.Food and the ideas of love and sex
                     


EVALUATIVE CRITERIA:
EVALUATION



You can accumulate 400 points, which are distributed as follows:

Participation (20%)
Discussion Forum Posts          48   (12%) ([email protected] 6 pts. ea.)
Journal Entries                          32   (8%)      ([email protected]  4pts. ea.)

Papers (80%)
Reflections                                 15      (3.75%)
Drafts &Peer Reviews              30      (7.5%)
Responding to Short Fiction    40     (10%)
Responding to Poetry               60     (15%)
Responding to Novel                75     (18.75%)
Final Exam                                100    (25%)

                                                                          Final Grades:
                                                                          360 - 400     A
                                                                          320 - 359     B
                                                                          280 - 319     C
                                                                          240 - 279     D
                                                                              0 - 239     F
                                                                
You must complete all major essay assignments in order to pass the course. Failure to complete any of the required assignments will result in a final course grade of F.


GRADING FEEDBACK:
Grades for online courses are provided in the ulearn gradebook for the course and final grades are transferred from the ulearn gradebook to uconnect at the end of the term. Students can track their progress during a course by viewing their grades using the My Grades link within ulearn.

Major projects and exams will have grades in ulearn within a week of due dates, other graded items will have grades in ulearn within three days from the due date.

CONTACT POLICY:
Almost always I will respond to email within 24 hours.  Likely, however, your response will be sooner as I check my email regularly (including weekends).  I'm also available to speak with you "live" during  the office hours listed above.  This conversation may take place via phone and/or chat (Blackboard chat, Yahoo Instant Messenger chat, of Facebook).  If you contact me via Facebook, I'm listed there as Ken Harmon. 
If office hours are not a convenient time for you, you can arrange an appointment for another time.

PROCEDURE FOR SUBMITTING ASSIGNMENTS;
Students should use the dropboxes in ulearn to submit assignments.  Instructions for submitting  individual assignments will be included in each drop box inside of the folders found in each week's course folder (i.e., Week 1, Week 2, etc.)  Students should be sure to put name and title of assignment on each submitted assignment.  Please submit these by copying and pasting your documents into the textbox provided.  Do not submit them as attachments.

LATE PAPER/ASSIGNMENT POLICY:  Turn in all your assignments on their scheduled due dates and by the times noted in Ulearn.  Assignments cannot be submitted after the due dates/times and work will not be accepted by email.  Any work sent by email will not be read and deleted.  I DO NOT ACCEPT LATE PAPERS. 

All major essays must show process and must be accompanied by all related materials (final draft, reflection, rough draft, workshop sheets, revision plans, photocopies of sources, collecting notes, and relevant journal entries).  NO PROCESS, NO GRADE.  Keep a duplicate copy of all assignments you turn into me.   Late papers may be accepted by the instructor in special situations only; however, the instructor reserves the right to deduct points for late work.

REVISION:  You may rewrite one failing essay (original grade of D or F); the rewritten essay may receive no higher than a “C.” 

PARTICIPATION POLICY:
State clear expectations for participation in discussion boards and any other communication tools in your course. For example, how many original and follow-up postings are required of students on a weekly basis, what constitutes acceptable postings, how are postings graded, etc. Reference any grading information (rubric, schema, detailed instructions) that may be found in the course.

ATTENDANCE POLICY:
While online courses may not require regular in-class attendance, students are expected to meet stated due dates and/or meeting requirements as provided by the faculty member at the beginning of each course. Students confirm enrollment by completing the first stated assignment by the due date. For additional information on the attendance policy, consult your campus student handbook.


A student's GPA is closely related to regular attendance and participation in a course.


J&W WITHDRAWAL POLICY
It is the student’s responsibility to initiate procedures leading to a formal withdrawal (“WP” or "WF) in order to avoid a failing (“F”) grade.  To receive a WP OR WF grade, a student must withdraw prior to April 17, 2011.  In order to qualify for a WP, the student must have an estimated grade of 60 or higher at the time of withdrawal.  If the estimated grade is less than 60, the student will be issued a WF, which is entered into the term and cumulative GPA as a failing grade until successul completion of the course at a later date.


OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT: 
Johnson & Wales University is committed to outcomes assessment.  Faculty and students are therefore part of an ongoing effort to determine and refine the effectiveness of instruction and learning. Names of individual students will not be used when reporting result

SPECIAL NEEDS STUDENTS:
Johnson & Wales is dedicated to providing reasonable accommodations to give learning disabled, physically challenged, and students with chronic medical conditions the opportunity to succeed in their academic pursuits. Students requesting services must have documentation on file with the Center for Academic Support and must request that the accommodation information be sent to the faculty member. 

Note: The ulearn interface can be modified by individual students to accommodate screen readers, personalized style sheets, and color and font preferences. Instructions are available in ulearn by clicking on the ulearn Technical Help Desk link and either going to the Frequenty Asked Questions or contacting a support specialist.

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY:
If a student is found responsible for cheating, plagiarizing or in any way compromising academic integrity, the student may be subject to both academic disciplinary action (including dismissal from class) and student conduct review action (up to and including dismissal from the university). For additional information refer to the Academic Misconduct section of the current student handbook.

PLAGIARISM:  All course assignments ask you to write using what you have learned in the course and using your own thinking and writing skills.  If you use any ideas, paraphrases, or exact wording from a source other than yourself (including a textbook), you must document the source using MLA parenthetical documentation style..  Any source used but not documented will be considered plagiarism, for which you will receive a failing grade for the course.  You might also be placed on probation or expelled from the university.  If you have any questions about plagiarism, ask before you act. 

FEW VERY IMPORTANT WORDS ABOUT PLAGARISM

A. Plagiarism, a SERIOUS, academic violation, which can lead to an F for the course, is the use of WORDS, IDEAS, or STRUCTURES of others (published sources, friends, relatives) without acknowledgment.  There is no excuse for willful plagiarism.

B.  Except where appropriate (quoting or paraphrasing from primary or secondary sources), your work is presumed to be totally your own writing (i.e. original).

C.  When you QUOTE OR PARAPHRASE FROM ANY sources, you MUST cite them with appropriate specific documentation (usually author and page number in parentheses + Works Cited list at end).  This includes subject matter of the essay.  If you quote or paraphrase precisely from a work of literature, you must cite the author of that work. 

D.  If you do not understand the format for documenting sources, see me for help before turning in an essay.  Refer to your handbook for further clarification.

For other questions about plagiarism see http://www.winthrop.edu/english/writingprogram/plagiar.htm
and see attached .pdf handout.

TURNITIN NOTIFICATION

Students agree that by taking this course, required assignments may be subject to submission to Turnitin.com for detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers will be included as source documents in the Turnitin.com reference database solely for the purpose of detecting plagiarism of such papers. Use of the Turnitin.com service is subject to the Usage Policy posted on the Turnitin.com site.

Your class ID and password for turnitin.com can be found in Ulearn.

COMPUTER AND BROWSER REQUIREMENTS:
In addition to the university’s existing requirement that students use computers with the latest antivirus software and operating system patches, you should own or have access to a computer that meets the requirements of ulearn. Note that not all browsers are compatible with ulearn and using an incompatible browser may cause browser errors when using certain features. Check to see if your computer and browser meet the ulearn requirements by clicking the Help link in ulearn and viewing the user guide that lists computer and browser requirements.

STUDENT TECHNICAL SUPPORT FOR ONLINE COURSES:
Technical help for ulearn is provided through the Help link in ulearn. The Help link has step-by-step instructions on using ulearn in the User Guides and it offers 24x7 support from ulearn specialists via phone, chat, or email. Please note that technical problems with your computer/software are not considered an acceptable excuse for missed work. It is recommended that you develop a back-up plan in case of technological difficulties.

STUDENT EMAIL:
Each student at Johnson & Wales receives an email account and uses Microsoft Outlook Web Access, a Web-based e-mail program that allows students to access their e-mail through their web browsers. Students are required to use their Johnson & Wales email account for all university-specific communication. Additionally, course-related email may be sent through the ulearn CourseMail system.

Student accounts are created automatically for those who are active and in good standing.  Student email addresses are available through uconnect at https://email.jwu.edu.  A student email address is [email protected]  Students should go to http://email.jwu.edu to logon and access their email.  Immediately contact the helpdesk at 1-866-598-4357 if you need assistance.  Take care of this the first day of class. 

Students are expected to check their ulearn email as well as their university email on a regular basis when enrolled in an online course.  Students are expected to maintain an email account throughout the semester and check it daily for important information regarding upcoming assignments, course announcements, etc.


CONTACT POLICY:  Emails will be responded to within 24 hours Monday through Sunday.  Live office hours will be four hours per week daily Monday - Thursday. You may email or drop by if on Charlotte campus.

NETIQUETTE POLICY:
All postings should reflect thoughtful engagement in course materials and should be clearly and grammatically written.  Respect for the opinions of others is required.
Click here for further detail.

COMPUTER AND BROWSER REQUIREMENTS:
In addition to the university’s existing requirement that students use computers with the latest antivirus software and operating system patches, you should own or have access to a computer that meets the requirements of ulearn. Note that not all browsers are compatible with ulearn and using an incompatible browser may cause browser errors when using certain features in ulearn. Check to see if your computer and browser meet the ulearn requirements by going to https://ulearn.jwu.edu and clicking on “Get a Taste of Online Learning” before logging in.

STUDENT TECHNICAL SUPPORT FOR ONLINE COURSES:
Technical help for ulearn is provided through the ulearn Technical Help Desk link in ulearn. The Technical Help Desk has step-by-step instructions on using ulearn in the Frequently Asked Questions and it offers 24x7 support from ulearn specialists via phone, chat, or email. Please note that technical problems with your computer/software are not considered an acceptable excuse for missed work. It is recommended that you develop a back-up plan in case of technological difficulties.

COURSE SCHEDULE:

  Week One:   Introduction to course.  Review of elements of literature.  Overview of elements of film. Ancient texts and universal themes: excerpts from religious texts, Greek and Roman works and Beowulf.

Week Two:   Food as archetype and metaphor:  fairy tales, folklore and myth.  Selected texts.  Assignment due.

Week Three:  Food as archetype and metaphor continued.  Case study:  Spirited Away. Test.

Week Four:  Food as expressions of character, culture and tensions between past/present.  Babette’s Feast:  film and text.  Assignment due.

Week Five:  Food as subject and metaphor in poetry and philosophy:  Odes of Pablo Neruda and other selected poetry. Assignment due.

Week Six:  Modern themes of identity and journeys of self-discovery.  Case Study: Sideways.  Excerpts from texts. Test.

Week Seven: Philosophy and food :  Kafka’s The Hunger Artist, excerpts from Thoreau and other selected writers. Film Critique due.

Week Eight:  Satire, Parody, Politics and Food.  Jonathan Swift’s A Modern Proposal and selected film and text excerpts. 

Week Nine:  Realism versus Magic Realism: Literature.   Study of the novel Like Water for Chocolate.  Assignment due. Test.

Week Ten: Realism versus Magic Realism continued.   Film comparison of Like Water for Chocolate and Chocolat.

Week Eleven:  Reading Days and Final Exam. Fianl Project due.

Note:  Syllabus is subject to change and any changes will be posted in ulearn.  For specific instructions regarding assignments and due dates, please see learning modules and weekly plan in ulearn.


HONORS OPTION:
An honors option is offered through this course.  In the first week, interested students should contact the faculty member to discuss what will be required.  Students must obtain the required paperwork from the University Honors Office.

WRITING INTENSIVE COURSES:

This is a university-designated writing intensive course. Required writing assignments must conform to the MLA research and writing style.  Organization, sentence structure, use of grammar, spelling and punctuation will be evaluated along with the content of assignments.  Students will have the opportunity to revise one formal assignment during the course.